During the 1950's and '60's, a national trend in suburban development prompted
    thousands of urban-dwellers to abandon the cities in favor of long-distance commutes to new
    homes in less populated areas.   Left behind were thousands of residents unable to relocate due
    to lack of transportation, affordable housing,  and "institutionalized" discrimination.   Over the
    years, major manufacturing companies also chose to relocate;  many settled in the suburbs and
    others migrated to remote off-shore locations - -  creating a mass exodus which generated local
    economic collapse and a  cascade of small-business failures.   By the 1990's, supermarkets, corner
    grocery stores, and other retail shops had all but vanished, and within a few years many formerly
    middle-class metropolitan neighborhoods had become identified  as "food deserts. "   Currently,
    within the United States, there are approximately 6,500 deprived and struggling low-income food-
    desert communities -- with over eighty percent located in large metropolitan areas.

    The Department of Agriculture defines a "Food Desert" as a low-income housing tract where
    at least thirty per cent of the population (many without transportation) reside one mile or more
    from a supermarket or major grocery store.  These under-served neighborhoods are the govern-
    ment  census tracts where 20 per cent or more of residents live below poverty level.

    According to the 2010 Census, as well as the USDA Data Base, 13.6 million Americans
    reside in food desert communities without major supermarkets, small business services, civic over-
    sight, or recreational opportunities.  Lacking access to grocery stores, and fresh produce, local resi-
    dents have become dependent upon a diet of highly caloric, nutrient-poor fast foods which have
    become available around the clock from a multitude of brand-name vendors and convenience stores.










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                                                      T H E   F A R M - and - T A B L E   F O O D  P A R K
                                                                        COMMERCIAL AND SERVICE DIVISIONS

    The following eight divisions will be included in the Food Park Model:                                               

    (1) AN URBAN FARM WITH AQUA-CULTURE COMPONENTS;   (2) SUPERMARKET';  (3) RESTAURANTS;  
    (4) TAKE-OUT CORRIDOR AND PRODUCE STAND;  (5) COOL PLANET GOURMET (a fund-raising division
    for the manufacturing and sale of prepared foods --  all profits dedicated to the support of Food Park edu-
    cational programs);   (6) LOADING ZONES FOR SCHEDULED SHUTTLE BUS SERVICES;   (7) A MULTI-
    PURPOSE COMMUNITY CENTER for food demonstrations and family cook-ins, health education programs
    for adults and children, public meeting rooms, and an auditorium for the arts and other community pro-
    grams (the Community Center blueprints will include optional automated panels to accommodate periodic
    health-screening clinics);  (8) SPORTS AND CREATIVE ARTS CENTER for after-school programs and  week-
    end events.




    FOOD PARK ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNS ARE FLEXIBLE:     A Food Park design may feature a campus with
    multiple divisions as shown above in our Food Park rendering; or, depending upon community choices,
    designs may be "high-rise" structures with expansive roof parks or elevated pathways circling the
    building.   A number of farms are referenced on-line as, "Urban Farms of the Future," depicting several
    with stacked growing platforms, while others  are built along river banks, and still others are buried
    among skyscrapers in central cities.  All have various cultivation methods featuring rotating growing walls,
    roof-fields, planter boxes, circular planting beds, recycled water systems, "aquaponics," and selected urban
    streets redesigned as bedding fields and community gardens.   Currently, the Farm and Table Food Park
    appears to be the only design combining goals for economic recovery with sustainable agriculture and the
    sale of retail food within a community park setting.
THE  COOL  PLANET GOURMET
G R E E N I N G   T H E   F O O D   D E S E R T S
A DIVISION OF THE URBAN FARM--TO--TABLE FOOD PARK
Home Page
and SOCIAL MODEL
for   Food Security
and Sustainable Cities
PEGGY FORSTER, M.A.
Founder and Chief Executive Officer


    IN SUMMARY, WHEN FULLY OPERATIONAL, THE MODEL FARM-TO-TABLE FOOD PARK
    will offer multi-service retail opportunities in a centralized setting with integrated and easily accessible
    markets and shops -- featuring an urban farm, a supermarket, restaurant, community center, and a pre-
    pared food facility, as well as steady jobs, nutrition education, and public health programs.  Scheduled  
    round-trip shuttle-bus services will offer residents transportation to and from adjacent neighborhoods.  
    After-school programs will offer varied activities in a safe and healthful in-door/outdoor setting.

    Through a combination of career-oriented employment, a secure food delivery system, and numerous
    community health programs, we believe Food-Deserts will soon become the FOOD-PARKS of the future
    revitalizing and restoring a myriad of under-served communities throughout the United States.

                                                               
    INSPIRING COMMUNITY INTEREST IN THE FARM and FOOD-PARK concept will require a step-by-
    step approach with an effective visual platform and design presentation.  We are developing
    a portfolio which includes an over-all cost analysis based upon optional funding estimates.

    TO SUPPORT AND  CLARIFY THE OVERALL RATIONALE FOR THE PROJECT, our presentation will
    include a comprehensive outline of public health goals and plans for community restoration and
    participation.  Each service division will be visualized  through architectural renderings and 3D
    table models demonstrating the community and health-oriented intention of the  complex.   
                                                                                                                   

                           G U I DE L I N E S   F O R   O U T R E A CH          


IN TRANSFORMING FOOD DESERTS INTO SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIES, we are integrating the science of climate change and global      
warming to  demonstrate the application and cost-effectiveness of renewable technologies -- meeting the challenges associated
with food insecurity, depleted eco-systems,  and rising sea levels.
  Growing food locally will eliminate transportation costs and
the polluting effects of big rigs and long-distance hauling.   Immediate implementation of zero-waste management practices and
"closed- loop" recycling will shrink our massive carbon footprint
, and help  reduce the heat-island effect within the inner cities.

WHILE BUILDING OUR MODEL for  FOOD SECURITY and ECONOMIC  RECOVERY in FOOD DESERTS,  we will also seek relationships
with the public and private sectors, envisioning the opportunity to join with public health clinics, hospitals, schools, restaurants,
and
community gardens for mutually beneficial partnerships and exchange programs.

As Food Deserts transition into sustainable economies, we believe the Farm-and-Table Food Park will  become the
model of
choice for urban agriculture and food security, providing  healthy lifestyles, stable employment,
and  cohesive communities  in          
hundreds of low-income areas  across the nation.
OUR  HEROES

Wildflowers of the Pribilof Islands
and
MISSION STATEMENT
vehicles to battery power and produced several videos
documenting the emergence of zero-emissions technology.           
In her professional life, Mrs. Forster is a licensed Marriage and
Family Therapist with a B.A., and M.A., in Psychology.  She
is certified in gerontological studies, holds a lifetime teaching
credential, and has taught communications skills for many
years. In addition, she served for several years as a volunteer
counselor with the Los Angeles Free Clinic.
Mrs. Forster also holds a certificate from UCLA Extension in
Global Sustainability (Earned with Distinction in 2012).
THE COOL PLANET GOURMET, a non-profit division of the Urban Farm-to-Table Food Park, will
serve as a supplemental funding source; all profits will be dedicated to our Food Park educational  
programs and classes in nutrition, agriculture, and healthy lifestyles.
How You Can Help
FEATURING NUTRITIOUS PREPARED AND FROZEN FOODS
Peggy Forster is a dedicated con-
servationist and advocate for
environmental justice, sustainable
communities, and the regulatory
policies necessary to protect public
health and safety. Over the years,
she has given her support to
numerous environmental causes
and has served with several local
environmental organizations.  In
1992, Mrs. Forster filmed the pro-
cess of converting gasoline-powered
The Environmental Relief Center
Studio City, California 91604
http://www.environmentalrelief.net
(818) 762-5852   
Economic,
IN PROGRESS
An  Environmental,
U R B A N
FARM-TO-TABLE
FOOD PARK
Please  See  Below    
IRLA  LEE  ZIMMERMAN, PH.D.
Secretary/Treasurer

                RESOURCE PUBLICATIONS AND REFERENCES:

1.  Breaking Through Concrete:  Building an Urban Farm Revival, by David Hanson and Edwin
Marty,  University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA;  2012.

2.  
Farms with a Future:  Creating and Growing a Sustainable Farm Business,
by Rebecca Thistlethwaite, Chelsea Green Publishing, White River Junction, Vermont; 2012.

3.
Confessions of a Radical Industrialist:  Profits, People, Purpose -- Doing Business by
Respecting the Earth, by Ray C. Anderson with Robin White.  St. Martin's Press, New York, NY,
10010; 2009.  

4.  
Farming Inside Cities:  Entrepreneurial Urban Agriculture in the United States, by
Jerry Kaufman, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania; and
Martin Bailkey, Senior Lecturer, Department of Landscape Architecture at University of
Wisconsin, Madison.  (Research on, "
How Community Organizations Gain Access to Vacant
Land in United States Cities
. Yr. 2000; (http://www.urbantilth.org.)

5.  References for Business Cooperatives:  1) The National Cooperative Business Association;  
(2) The United States Federation for Business Cooperatives.

6.   Harvard Business Review on Green Business Strategy;  Copyright 2007; Paperback Series;
Harvard Business School Press and Publishing Corporation, 60 Harvard Way, Boston, MA 02163

7.  Recent legislative action regarding California urban agriculture:
Reference AB #551, authored by Assembly-member, Phil Ting, District 19, San Francisco:     
In October of 2013, California enacted legislation declaring it is in the public interest to
promote sustainable farm-enterprise-sectors in urban centers.  Assembly Bill 551, entitled:

Urban Agriculture Incentive Zones Act
, spurs counties and cities to encourage the creation of
urban farms by providing tax incentives for owners of vacant or blighted land which allows for
food production on privately owned urban acreage.

8.  Reference AB #2561:  With the passage of this Bill,
Civil Code Section 4750 (Personal
Agriculture)
, was added to the Common Interest Development Act effective 2014. (Please see
Los Angeles Times, Sunday, November 16, 2014, Page
B9, "California Law Supports Letting
(Home)Owners Grow Veggies." by Donie Vanitzian.) Excerpt follows:

"In changing the law, California's Legislature declared:  "According to a 2011 United
States Census Report, California has the highest poverty rate in the United States.  Giving
California residents the right to grow food where they live will help reduce food costs and the
overall burden of poverty for low-income Californians."  It also declared that, "a significant
amount of California's food is grown hundreds or thousands of miles from where it is
consumed.  This results in high transportation costs, energy consumption, and lost economic
opportunity for our state.  Even food grown in the heart of California's farming region is
expensive to disperse to the rest of the state due to fuel costs."

                                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


SUSTAINABLE URBAN FARM-TO-TABLE FOOD PARK PROPOSAL:
For additional information, contact:  
The Environmental Relief Center
Studio City, CA 91604
Peggy Forster, Director
peggy.forster@prodigy.net
(www.environentalrelief.net)
(818) 762-5852
SHIPS, TRUCKS, and TRAINS
by ANDREA HRICKO

ENVIRONMENTALISTS PAY PRICE FOR  
COMPROMISE, by SEEMA MEHTA

"MEANING"  by  CZESLAW MILOSZ

VISIONING HOPE, by PETER DOUGLAS

STRENGTHENING AIR QUALITY LAWS
by JESSE MARQUEZ

SAVING THE WETLANDS

Protecting Under-ground Miners
by Celeste Monforton



COPYRIGHT PROVISIONS:
Please Note:
The Environmental Relief Center (a non-
profit private foundation dedicated to
environmental education, sustainability,
and public health) understands that
selected copyright materials may be
reprinted for educational purposes.  If you
are a Copyright holder, under the Fair Use
Provision of United States Copyright Law,
and believe we have mistakenly
published  your  materials, please contact
us and we will immediately remove your
informative essays, articles, or data.
                    "Local Jobs Supporting Local Communities"
        TO ASSURE JOB SECURITY AND EQUITABLE OPPORTUNITIES, an alternative economic structure for the
    Food Park Model lies within an organizational "COOPERATIVE" paradigm in which employees jointly own
    the enterprise and thereby share in executive decisions concerning Food Park investments and expan-
    sion, distribution of profits, and rotational career-building opportunities.                                     
    FOR MANY YEARS, NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, ALONG WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL AGENCIES,
    have offered innovative programs to supplement the health and nutritional needs of "Food Desert"
    communities.  Significant local interventions have ranged from residential gardens, to the introduction
    of fresh-food carts, mobile health clinics, nutritional guidance, electronic banking credits, food trucks,
    and produce vending in corner stores.  Certainly, there have been numerous personal and community
    improvements as a result of these beneficial services, but lacking economic stability and long-term
    employment, positive outcomes are difficult to assess and many evaluations remain incomplete.
P R O J E C T   D E S I G N    A N D   P R E S E N T A T I ON
TRANSFORMING A "FOOD DESERT" INTO A FOOD OASIS  
    B U I L D I N G  A  S U S T A I N A B L E,  U R B A N  
F A R M - and - T A B L E  F O O D  P A R K
    A PROJECT OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL RELIEF CENTER
IIlustraton by:  Art Curtis
I N T R O D U C T I O N   TO   G R E E N I N G   T H E   F O O D  D E S E R T S
WHEN  COMPLETED  AND  FULLY  OPERATIONAL , THE FARM-and-TABLE  FOOD  PARK  WILL COMBINE URBAN
AGRICULTURE  WITH A FULL-SERVICE  SUPERMARKET,  PREPARED FOOD DIVISIONS, RESTAURANTS, AND A
COMMUNITY CENTER, PROVIDING A SUSTAINABLE  MODEL FOR  PUBLIC HEALTH AND ECONOMIC RECOVERY  
IN FOOD-DESERT COMMUNITIES.                                  

THE FOOD PARK MODEL WILL ALSO SERVE AS A SHOW-CASE FOR RENEWABLE TECHNOLOGIES SUCH AS
SOLAR, WIND AND  OTHER RENEWABLE  INNOVATIONS INCLUDING ZERO-WASTE MANAGEMENT AND WATER
RECYCLING.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THROUGHOUT THE FARM AND FOOD- PARK COMPLEX, CONCERN FOR PHYSICAL SAFETY
will guide the architectural features and over-all design for buildings, public paths, and
elevated boardwalks, providing easy access to fresh produce and retail services, outdoor
activities, nutrition education, after-school programs, and family cooking classes in a safe
and secure community-park setting.